Things I’ve learned about writing: how to receive feedback

Feedback. On your precious writing. Also known as critique, constructive criticism, edits, thoughts, comments, disemboweling, soul crushing … I’m talking here about those written reports, emails, notes, track changes etc, which might be given by relatives, friends, critique partners, tutors, mentors, competition readers, agents, and editors, to you, on your full or partial manuscript.

Never mind that you asked these lovely people to review your manuscript for free; or paid them for advice; or have a contract that shows they already love the story – giving your work to someone else to read can be heart-shakingly hard. You may have spent three years getting this story up to scratch, and then a person reads it in less than a day and tells you lots of things they think are wrong with it. HOW you respond to feedback may vary depending on the WHO, but trust me, it’s going to involve emotional turmoil of some kind.

You probably won’t like or agree with some of what they have to say when you first receive it. Any of these sound familiar?

  • The critic just doesn’t get what I’m trying to do.
  • What does she mean there’s too much description?
  • Why has he suggested cutting that entire chapter full of beautiful lyrical prose?
  • Get rid of my favourite character who may actually have no purpose?
  • What do they mean I used the word ‘just’ 70 million times? (okay, maybe that one’s valid.)

Ten Tips from someone who’s been there

Here are some tips from my own hard-earned experience of receiving (and giving) writing feedback:

1. All the feels: Accept that you might get emotional and allow yourself to feel all the feelings: anger; denial; irritation; utter, utter bleak despair, etc. But only for a bit. (It used to take me a full week, plus subsequent relapses. Now it’s down to about half a day and a large glass of wine.) I suggest giving yourself a one-week limit on the wallowing, otherwise you might talk yourself into giving up altogether, and not writing is a surefire way to never finish your manuscript, win a writing contest, get an agent, be published etc.

2. Let it out: During this period, vent if necessary to a friend, another writer, dog, cat, your pillow. I suggest doing this privately. It’s likely your critic moves in the same social media circles, and you may change your mind about their feedback after reviewing it. (see 3 and 4).

3. Share the feedback with a trusted (writer) friend who will helpfully point out all the positive things the feedback contains that you have failed to notice in your distress/panic/misery etc.

4. Re-read: When you’re feeling less fragile/ranty, go back to the feedback and re-read it. At this stage, I go through the notes and track changes replying to the critic’s comments and suggestions. I don’t share my responses, but I find it a useful way to blast away any residual indignation. And as I’m explaining my thinking, I start to see that some of the feedback I thought was ridiculous, is pretty helpful, and my responses might include: ‘hmmm’ and ‘good thought’, ‘will rethink this’ etc. For other points raised, I am very clear why they need to be there. But if the critic can’t see what I’m trying to do, maybe I need to add in a little more or make a change?

Quite often, what you think are going to be MAMMOTH plot-destroying edits, can be resolved by adding or removing a sentence or two.

5. Questions: On the next read-through, try to be objective. Ask yourself questions: What is the feedback really saying if you put your own emotions to one side? Why does the critic not get what you are trying to say? Why do they think you should cut a subplot, character or chapter? Think it through, pick it apart. Work out how it might work differently. Or if it’s better staying the same.

6. And more questions: The best feedback tends to involve the critic asking you things rather than ‘telling’ you what you should do. Some of their questions will be those you want your reader to ask – the things that will make them want to read on. (e.g., why did Jeremy hide that llama in the shed? I wonder if his mum will find out?) If the critic is picking these things up, then you’re doing well. Is the critic asking about something that will be explained later in the story? If so, do you need to seed it in earlier or does it work where it is? Is the critic’s question about clarifying some aspect of the story? If so – do you want your reader befuddled about it at this point (e.g., for a red herring or later plot twist) or does the reader need to be really clear about the issue at this point in the story?

7. Fresh eyes: However polished your manuscript is now, at some point it was a first draft; a vomit draft; a draft that had a 20,000-word subplot you’ve since dismembered; a draft with some chapters that were entirely constructed of: ‘and then this happened and then she did something really interesting and then…’  And when you’ve been working on a story for a long time, you can miss cling-ons from long-departed subplots or early unpolished writing. Think about how many times you use looking, shrugging, just. How a character who didn’t make it into draft two, randomly pops up in chapter 26. How often you spot typos in published books. Fresh eyes will pick these things up and that’s a real plus of feedback. Embrace the nit-picky editing comments.

8. Don’t bring me solutions … Feedback that points out big issues or inconsistencies is helpful, honestly. But critics sometimes offer solutions, and it can feel like they’re trying to run away with your story. I’ve been guilty of this myself when giving feedback. If you’re on the receiving end, it can make you feel defensive, but try to take it as a compliment: they’re so engaged with your characters they’re coming up with scenarios for them. Even if their suggestions don’t work for you, the process of looking at other options can sometimes lead you to a better idea than you had originally. 

9. Everyone’s a critic: Take into account WHO is giving you feedback. Of course, an industry professional’s editorial notes will be at the highest level, and they’ll be taking into consideration other issues like the gatekeepers and the market. And if they’ve bought your book, then you are most likely going to go along with their suggestions. Non-writers giving you feedback don’t necessarily understand the implications of cutting or changing something that seems relatively small to them – how snipping at a subplot or a minor character, can unravel the thousand threads you’ve painstakingly woven together to make a story. What I usually do in this situation is to get more feedback from other people and see if anyone else brings the issue up. If they do, it needs looking at. If not, keep calm and carry on. 

10. Tough love: Feedback is helpful even if it crushes your soul, sends you in a spiral, or you simply don’t agree with it. Feedback makes you think about your craft. It makes you examine your story. It helps you to be a better writer. Look on it at as necessary experience in toughening yourself up – you do need to be brave to put your words out there. Publishing is a weird and wonderful world, ruled by luck and serendipity. As you progress through the industry you will need to be open to constructive criticism and willing to make changes. Not everyone will love or like your story, but some people will. And writing a story is in itself an achievement.

Coming soon(ish): Things I’ve Learned About Writing: How to Give Feedback  

Things I’ve learned about writing: The power of prompts

Prickly Chairs – photograph by Royston Hunt of earthnotes

The picture above was the prompt for the 2020 Flash Fiction Festival Micro Fiction contest. I was thrilled to come first with my story Eye, Aye, I.

Prizes courtesy of Bath Flash Fiction Award and earthnotes

Entering online short story competitions is how I first dared to put my work out into the world. These past few years I’ve entered fewer, focusing instead on writing novels. But having recently parted from my agent, finished a novel, and lurking in lockdown lethargy, I’ve found myself searching out short story and flash fiction competitions once more. There’s a kind of comfort in it, a way of reminding myself that I can still write, that I will have more ideas. 

This kind of sums up writing life. However far along the publishing path you get, at some point you invariably loop back to a place you were before – older, wiser, and hopefully a better writer.

Prompts and Competitions

Having a prompt is supremely helpful when you’re feeling blocked, tired, depressed, apathetic, anxious, etc.

Entering a writing contest or challenge gives you something to aim for, a deadline, and a sense of achievement, even if you aren’t placed. The online Flash Fiction community is friendly, supportive and inclusive. Many contests are free, or low cost, and are more about the joy of writing rather than anything else.

If you’d like to give some micro, flash or short fiction a go, here are a few competitions to get you started.

Micro Fiction

Retreat West Monthly

NAWG 100×100

50 Word Stories

81 words

101 words

Christopher Fielden Writing Challenges

Flash Fiction

Flash 500 Quarterly

Retreat West Quarterly

Bath Flash Fiction Award 

Didcot Writers

London Independent Story Prize

Short Story

Flash 500

Bath Short Story Award

Writing with mental ill health

This is a blog I wrote back in August for the #WriteMentor Spark Programme. Another of Stuart White’s wonderful inclusive and encouraging iniatives, Spark is a good affordable way to get help with your writing and engage with the children’s writing and publishing community.

How to keep writing when you have mental ill health – 6 practical tips

Alongside therapy, medication, and exercise, many people find writing can help to manage their mental health.

Confused Mental Health GIF by Lisa Vertudaches

But there’s a catch: How do you write when depression means just getting out of bed is too hard? Or OCD has you stuck in a loop of some tedious behaviour? Or anxiety tells you that you’re not good enough, you’ll never be a writer, and sends your brain spiralling?

Having lived with chronic anxiety since childhood, plus depression and OCD on the side, in my experience life is always better when I’m writing. Any kind is good – non-fiction, journaling, memoir, poetry, therapeutic – but for me, fiction works best. Here, I offer some practical tips to help you keep writing on difficult days.

How to keep writing – tips

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#1 Keep your tools handy

Sounds obvious perhaps, but have a notepad and pen with you – in your bag, in the car, by the bed. Even if you can’t get out from under the duvet, you can write something.

Write ANYTHING.

Write about last night’s dreams. Write down the brilliant comeback you thought of three hours after that irritating thing someone said to you. Write a word or a sentence that sums up how you feel right now.

Or maybe how you’d like to feel …

#2 Use a routine prompt

Many writers swear by a writing routine however, it can be counterproductive. Not meeting targets gives anxiety and OCD plenty of ammo for ‘you’re a failure’ type thoughts.

It can be helpful though, to have a routine prompt. This is a phrase to use daily, or as needed, to start off the writing. There’s a certain comfort in having it there to fall back on. Make one up, or ‘borrow’ someone else’s.

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Joanne Harris, author of the novels The Strawberry Thief and Chocolat, amongst many others, often tweets a sentence starting: ‘And this morning the Shed is … ’

‘ … a ball of red string, rolling down a corridor … ’ 14 Aug 19

‘ … a beach hammock, strung between two coconut palms, with bright birds singing overhead and the sound of the surf in the distance … ’ 11 Aug 19

My current routine prompt is: ‘This morning’s skies are … ’

Even if you only follow this with ‘blue’ or ‘grey’, you have a sentence. And one sentence is the start of something. But it’s not really about describing the colour of the sky. Use all your senses – how does the day feel? Sound? Taste? Stay real world or go fantasy.

#3 Use a random prompt

Gather random prompts: words or sentences that strike a chord, and keep a list of them in the back of your notebook to use when the thought of a bigger project is too much.

Try: 

renee zellweger GIF
  • Song lyrics, even misheard ones.
  • News headlines – reimagine the story.
  • A snippet of overheard conversation – where does it take you? What comes next?
  • A line from a poem, a novel, a movie

Don’t overthink it. Set yourself a short time limit, and free write –anything that comes into your head.

There are plenty of prompts online, but procrastinating is likely! Stick with one, like Ad Hoc Fiction, which gives a weekly one word prompt for Flash Fiction. It’s a good way to get writing, with the added bonus of a free weekly competition!

#4 Restrict yourself

Although setting rules can be problematic, particularly with OCD, on bad days it’s possible to coax yourself into writing by restricting what you write. (The stubborn part of me that doesn’t like being told what to do, will often rebel, so I end up with more words in any case.)

Try writing:

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haiku – only 17 syllables – you can manage that !Try and sum up a character from your story in haiku form, or the setting. If this is too hard, try and describe a person or place you know in real life.

A 100 word story in one syllable words – not sure where this came from originally, but I first learned of it at a  Writing Events Bath Workshop  where we wrote our life stories in 100 one syllable words. Give it a go!

This type of exercise is known as constrained writing and an advantage for the depressed writer is that it requires a small amount of energy, and provides a satisfying result. For the anxious writer, with a mind spiralling out of control, it provides a focus.

#5 Redefine writing

Are you on a wordcount downer? Not enough energy or focus to write?

Writing is not all about the number of words on the page. There are other things you can do that count as writing. Give yourself permission to:

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DOODLE – particularly good for anxiety and the fidgety. Pen in hand, pen on paper, it’s almost writing. There’s no pressure for it to BE anything, but a doodle might turn into a word, a sentence, a story …

READ – ANYTHING! Picture books, happy books, simple stories, something different to what you’d usually choose. 

Put your own work onto an e-reader, and read it like it’s a published novel. You’ll be surprised at how uplifting this is.

WATCH TV – maybe put the subtitles on. Try and focus on one thing. A character’s voice, setting, dialogue.

LISTEN TO MUSIC – try a movie soundtrack with your eyes closed – how does the music make you feel? What kind of scene does it conjure up?

#6 Turn outwards

Connect with other creative people, many of whom will also have experience of mental ill health, and find your writing family. This can be difficult to do, especially if you have social anxiety, so do it with care, and protect yourself. The #WriteMentor community is a great place to start – safe, supportive and inclusive.

Resources:

Writing and Mental Health Research:

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/dec/13/writers-depression-top-10-risk

Writing with mental ill-health:

Constrained Writing:

Writers who write and tweet about mental health: 

Holly Bourne

Matt Haig

Yasmin Rahman

Stuart White

Endurance Writing Part 2

Sunday morning run on the cycle track through woods.

May is a month that weeps green. Cow parsley and nettles reach my shoulders in places along the path. The smell of wild garlic shouts life, joy, hope, and mingles with the sleazy scent of hawthorn flowers.

This is a path I run often, through all the seasons, and I love it.

The very first short story I had published was born here, about eight years ago. Little Red Running Hood. I entered an online competition run by the wonderful Inktears. The story was commended, and published on their website. I look at the story now with a critical eye, of course. Certainly, I didn’t understand the concept of killing darlings back then. 😁

Still, it was a big step for me, just putting my work out there, and it led, of course to the next step, the next story, and on, and on. Before that had been four years of concerted effort, daily writing without feedback or having any idea what I was doing, and trying to outrun my shyness at sharing stories. And the negatives still lurk in my mind – comparing myself to others, how long it takes me to write anything, the constant balance between being in the real world and not lost in the one(s) in my head, the combination of luck and timing and some other unknowable magic that results in success.

Anyway, today, running through the woods, and remembering how this place inspired the first seeds of that story, I thought of all the writing I’ve done since, all the ideas, the manuscripts started, finished, ongoing. The milestones, the warm and wonderful interactions with other writers. The writers who’ve helped me. The writers I’ve helped. The family I’ve found. All the good stuff.

Perhaps we writers should take stock of all the little steps, and what they amount to, more often, and be kinder to ourselves.

There’s a saying ‘all writing is rewriting’. It’s attributed to many writers – Hemingway, Capote, E B White, and John Green amongst them – so I guess it must be true. But also I think all writing is learning. Learning about yourself, and the world, and the people in it. Learning about the graft of it. The craft of it. The love of it.

#WriteMentor Summer 2019

It’s back! #WriteMentor – the highly successful mentoring progamme for YA and children’s writers. And I’m delighted to be a mentor again this year.

Why I Mentor

I’ll tell you the truth. This time last year I was pretty low about my own writing. My novel had been out on submission with publishers for a (long) while and things were not looking promising. I struggled to write, had repetitive strain injury from refreshing my emails, and spent far more time than was good for me on twitter.

Then I spotted a tweet by Stuart White asking for mentors for his new #WriteMentor programme. I loved his positive and inclusive approach, and his honesty. I applied to the programme because, even though I wasn’t in a great place writing-wise, I had got this far at least, and had some knowledge to share. And because, I wouldn’t have got this far without the help and support of other writers. And because, following your dream is not the whimsical prance among butterflies and unicorns it sounds. It’s a bloody hard slog up a mountain only to find another, steeper one beyond. Sometimes, it’s good to have a helping hand.

I used to write in isolation, too scared to show anyone else my stories. It took a long time but I managed to overcome my fear, and now I can’t imagine writing without the feedback and support of fellow trusted writers. I mentor because I want to help someone else take their next step.

I found my writing family while studying for an MA in Writing for Young People at Bath Spa University. But I appreciate that such an opportunity is not available to everyone. So, I’d like to support a writer who may be nervous about sending their story out into the world, or who hasn’t yet found their writing community, or someone who struggles with the whole ‘putting yourself out there’ part of the journey to becoming a published author.

My mentee for #WriteMentor 2018 was @lydia_massiah. You can read an interview about our experience, and the exciting things that happened next for Lydia here. There are many other success stories from the #WriteMentor Progamme, too.

Lydia is now a mentor on this year’s programme. This is one of the many joys of the #WriteMentor experience. It is such a supportive community.

My Background

Qualifications

I have a degree in English Studies (Literature, Linguistics & Creative Writing), a Post Graduate Certificate in Marketing, and a Masters with Distinction in Writing for Young People from Bath Spa University.

Experience

My short stories have been published online, in writing magazines, and anthologies, after being placed or listed in competitions. Read an example here.

The Masters in Writing for Young People from Bath Spa University is a very practical qualification, which is taught by published children’s and YA authors including David Almond, Julia Green and CJ Skuse. My two years on the course gave me lots of experience of writing in different genres for a variety of age groups, as well as critical reading of published children’s fiction, editing, giving and receiving feedback/critique, and insight into the publishing industry. I was one of three co-editors of the 2016 course anthology Paper Worlds. Read the opening of my YA novel Lightning Ridge.

I regularly edit, critique and proofread for fellow YA and MG writers, several of whom are published authors. I’m also a reader for a couple of writing competitions.

What I’m Looking For

YA and MG

I am happy to mentor either YA or MG. I read, write and edit both. I’m currently reading Fleur Hitchcock‘s wonderful MG novel: The Boy who Flew and V. E. Schwab‘s YA novel: The Unbound. At the moment, I’m writing a YA speculative fiction novel, and a Middle Grade contemporary/fantasy.

I like stories that make me think and have some beauty in them. I’m drawn to dark stuff. Contemporary realism, the grittier the better; feminist anything; speculative fiction; issue books, particularly mental health; multiple narratives; historical; verse novels.

Favourite novels: Skellig; The Hate You Give; One; The Lie Tree; The Color Purple; The Knife of Never Letting Go; The Power; Born Scared; Crongton Knights; Amy Chelsea Stacy Dee; Joe All Alone; The Goldfish Boy; The Handmaid’s Tale; To Kill a Mockingbird; Wonder; Rosie Loves Jack; The Poet X; Long Way Down.

Genre

An empathetic character and a strong narrative voice are far more important to me than the book’s genre. I read and love all sorts of books (with the possible exception of Romance and Pony Stories), but I do understand that some readers and writers have a real passion for a particular genre (usually fantasy and/or sci-fi). I know that these superfans read fantasy in a different way to me – some of them are my closest friends! So if you want that kind of intense, genre-specific reader, one of the other mentors who specifically state that preference might be better for you.

BUT, whatever the genre, your story still needs a plot, characters, setting, voice, tension, pace and so on, and these are all things I am used to working with.

Mentoring process

For me, the mentoring process is not about one writer telling another what they should do. It’s a dialogue between the two of you, and you’re both on the same side, trying to make the story the best it can be. It’s important to be honest with each other, to be open to feedback and suggestions offered. But the final decision is, of course, with the mentee, as it’s their manuscript.

I’ll do a full read through and provide a detailed report on all aspects of your novel, with particular attention to anything you’ve raised as a concern in your application. Where relevant/helpful I may provide notes in track changes for parts of the MS. We will set objectives and deadlines together and I will reread sections of the MS as needed. We’ll communicate on a regular basis via email.

My aim is to provide kind, honest, constructive feedback. I know from personal experience that it can be difficult to receive criticism of your writing, but I also know how much better it’s made mine!

Any questions?

Have a look around my website and the #WriteMentor website for further information. If there’s anything not covered, you can contact me via DM on twitter. @KClarkwriter

Mentoring, Editing and Reading Services

I’m now offering mentoring, editing and reading services for writers of Middle Grade, Teen and YA fiction, and short stories of all kinds.

I believe in giving kind and constructive feedback, and my aim is to help writers on to the next step of their journey.  If you’d like to know about my qualifications and experience please take a look here.

Services include a Submission Package, Full Report, Procrastinator’s Package, Beta Reading, and the Teen Reader Report. Further details can be found here.

Please take a look and get in touch if you’d like any further information.

Endurance Writing

This is not a humble brag, or any other kind of brag for that matter, (and if you ever saw me running, you’d know that is the truth), but I’m in training for a half-marathon. I’m the sort of runner whose main aim is to make it to the start line, never mind the finish. Personal bests, credible times and podiums (ha ha), be damned.

Anyway, I’m in the endurance phase of my training programme. These are the weeks when you turn up, day after day, and put in the miles. Good days, bad days, fast or slow, sun or rain, flowing or stuttering. (Yes, it is a writing metaphor.) Often, I feel like I’m getting slower, less fit, more achy. Too old, my body protests. But I keep on. Because I’ve been here before. In a few weeks time, some magic will happen, and I will run a longer distance than I ever felt was possible. (Yes, that is also a writing metaphor.)

Writing fills my mind while I run. I ponder specifics, like what one character will say to another, and how the hell I’m going to fill that quarry-sized plot hole. (Water? A lot of gravel?) I wonder if I’m any good, and will I ever be published, and will it matter either way, and should I just give up?

I’m not good at running. I’m not fast. I’m definitely not graceful. It doesn’t necessarily make me happier. But I have a need to do it.  And writing is the same. Something I need to do, deep down in the blood and bones and heart of me.

But still, some days I think of stopping. Sometimes, it’s too hard. In fact, I did give up once, for over a decade actually. It did me no good at all.

Today it occurred that the endurance phase of my writing life is now nudging twelve years. But then I realised that it’s not a phase at all, that this is writing. How it’s going to be. Whether you are published or not, if you have to write, the endurance phase lasts forever.

This, strangely, did not lead to despair. It made me relax. I accepted it. Being published, self-published, unpublished – all of that is very separate to what it means to be a writer.

These thoughts may have been set in motion by a writing group I went to for the first time this week. I walked into a pub and sat with a group of people, none of whom I’d met before. Some were published or self-published, some had no interest in publication, all had writing projects on the go – travel journals, graphic novels, therapeutic writing, screen plays, autobiographies, novels.  We spent time talking about our writing. We wrote for twenty minutes. We read out what we’d written – always a bit terrifying. We gave feedback to each other.

At the end, one of the writers said, ‘We’ve all done something special, something a bit weird, this evening. We’ve come here to sit and write.’

I left feeling both special and weird (which is, frankly, the best way to feel about yourself), and knowing that there are other people who feel like that too. In fact, some of the best people in the world are like that (they know who they are), and they have kept me going when I thought I might give up. People who are tied to writing too, who love it, and will keep on doing it for love alone.

So, if you are one of us, and you hit a bump/hill/mountain in your writing road, stand back a moment, and remember why you do it, remember why you write.

And then take out your notebook and your pen and …

 

More about #WriteMentor and me

I’m sure there are a few writers lurking around the WriteMentor hashtag not asking questions even though they might want to, and wondering if they have the nerve to apply to the programme. It’s scary to share your writing, and I avoided doing it myself for a really long time. But it is so worth being brave, being bold, and doing it.

The #WriteMentors are a genuine bunch who want to help their fellow writers. I haven’t met any of them in real life but we are connected by our passion for writing, and there is a wonderful supportive feel about the whole group.

This week has been frenetic on twitter. I’ve had my first Q and A sessions. It’s been fun, but I do find it pretty hard coming up with answers on the spot. We introverts need time to think before we respond! Also, I like to redraft fifteen times before I show anyone my words, even tweets … and I’ve just noticed a typo in one of them.

Anyway, I thought it might be helpful to have some more considered information about my writing and my critiquing experience.

Here’s a bit about what I write:

I write about the things that scare me. I am fascinated by voice – that’s the character’s voice (narrative voice) rather than authorial voice, and so I sometimes have multiple narrators. I also write speculative fiction – basically sci-fi that’s closer to real world than fantasy.

I write stories for younger teenagers and children, too, usually contemporary realism with a bit of humour, and the odd fantastical element.

I write in first person, third person and sometimes (probably more than I should) in second person. I usually write in present tense, but not always.

You can read an extract from my YA MS and a humorous teen short story on the ‘read’ menu to give you an idea of some of my writing.

What have I beta read, critiqued and edited?

Here are some examples of the types of manuscripts I have been privileged to read and give feedback on:

Middle Grade: fantasy adventure, third person, past tense; magical middle grade third person, past tense; magical middle grade, first person, past tense; contemporary issue-led middle, first person, present; historical detective; dual contemporary/historical narrative; adventure; funny 7-9, first person; fairy, third person; funny, first person, past tense.

Teen: funny detective, first person, present; LGBTQIA romance/humour, first person; adventure, third person.

YA: Historical UK set; Historical Europe set; contemporary detective, first person, present; Sci-Fi, first person; contemporary with magical elements; dark contemporary with multiple narrators; fantasy with dual narrator; LGBTQIA contemporary.

A bit about genre

Genre was coming up a lot in the Q and A. I read and love all sorts of books with the possible exception of horror, but I do understand that some readers and writers have a real passion for a particular genre (usually fantasy and/or sci-fi). I know that these superfans read fantasy in a different way to me – some of them are my closest friends! So if you want that kind of intense, genre-specific reader, one of the other mentors who specifically state that preference might be better for you. BUT, whatever the genre, your story still needs a plot, characters, voice, pace and so on and these are all things I am used to working with.

There are 27 mentors now on #WriteMentor! So, take a look and see if any of them sound like writers who could help with your work. You can choose three to apply to. The closing date for applications is 11th may 2018.